How ‘ghost corporations’ are funding the 2016 election

Published on Author VA5
Lawmakers gather along with lobbying groups for a press conference in 2014 to discuss a constitutional amendment to overturn the Citizens United ruling. (Melina Mara/The Washington Post)
Lawmakers gather along with lobbying groups for a press conference in 2014 to discuss a constitutional amendment to overturn the Citizens United ruling. (Melina Mara/The Washington Post)

Advocates for stronger campaign-finance enforcement fear there will be even more pop-up limited liability corporations (LLCs) funneling money into independent groups, making it difficult to discern the identities of wealthy players seeking to influence this year’s presidential and congressional contests.

The 2016 campaign has already seen the highest rate of corporate donations since the Supreme Court unleashed such spending with its 2010 Citizens United v. FEC decision.

One out of every eight dollars collected by super PACs this election cycle have come from corporate coffers, including millions flowing from opaque and hard-to-trace entities, according to a Washington Post analysis of federal campaign finance filings.